Students Got A Taste Of Chinese Culture At The International Festival

UJCI, which is UJ’s institute of Chinese studies, performed the Lion dance, the Tai chi and the WuShu dances on stage at the Festival.

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By Valerie Mncube

The University of Johannesburg’s Confucius Institute (UJCI) showcased Chinese culture in a three-part performance during UJ’s International Festival at APK today.

UJCI, which is UJ’s institute of Chinese studies, performed the Lion dance, the Tai chi and the WuShu dances on stage at the Festival.

Lion Dance

The lion dance is a celebratory dance usually performed during the new year. In Chinese culture, this dance is used to chase away evil spirits and bring goodwill to the audience. The dance is performed by two people inside a four-legged dragon costume that has many vibrant colours with red being the most dominant.

Tai chi

Tai chi is a very slow form of body movement that symbolises good health and good posture. Performers wear the same colour. All the clothes were imported from China for quality control.

Tai-Chi
A uniformed move of the Tai Chi dance. Photo by Onthatile Kgoadigoadi.

WuShu

The WuShu is also a form of martial arts but is considerably faster than Tai chi. It is used for self-defence and makes use of the body as well as weapons such as swords, which come in different lengths.

Wu-Shu
An example of a Wushu move that was performed in the Festival. Photo by Onthatile Kgoadigoadi.

The Confucius Institute invites all students to learn more about the Chinese culture at the WuShu Festival happening on the 26th of October from 17:30-1930 at the UJ Arts Centre Theatre at APK.

UJ hosts the International Festival on an annual basis to celebrate the different cultures in the sudent community.

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