What (UJ) Students Should Know About Date Rape

Coercion is not a form of consent. Date rape can happen to anyone.

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By UJ Campus Health Service (4 mins read)

Sex without consent from the other party is regarded as rape. When a person is intoxicated, they are unable to make rational decisions and individuals should avoid having intercourse with that person even if they are your partner, as it will be regarded as rape.

What is Date Rape?

Date Rape is when a person, known to the other, forces that person to have sex while on a date.

It is sexual assault, even though there may have been initial physical intimacy that was accepted and enjoyed by the victim or survivor.

The victim or survivor is drugged to make the rape or assault easier.

What are date rape drugs?

Rohypnol (the forget pills)

  • Works like a tranquilizer;
  • Causes muscle weakness;
  • Fatigue;
  • Slurred speech;
  • Amnesia that lasts up to 24 hours;
  • They look like aspirin;
  • When dissolved in liquids, they can take effect in as little as 20 minutes.

Gamma Hydroxybutyric (also known as “liquid x”, “salt water” or “scoop”)

  • Causes quick sedation;
  • Its side effects include drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, headaches and death;
  • Mental confusion;
  • Looks like white, grainy powder.

What to do if you have been sexually assaulted

  • Go to a safe location away from the attacker;
  • Contact protection services, campus health or contact the PsyCad 24-hour crisis line;
  • Seek medical attention as soon as possible;
  • Preserve all evidence of assault (Do not shower, wash, brush teeth or change clothes);
  • If you suspect you’ve been drugged, request that a urine sample be collected;
  • Do not isolate yourself, do not feel guilty, and do not try to ignore it because you went on a date with a person.

What to do when someone you care about has been sexually assaulted

  • When supporting a survivor of sexual assault, do not be judgmental or take control away from the victim;
  • Be a good listener;
  • Do not ask the victim to tell you the story many times;
  • Always respect the victim’s confidentiality;
  • Let the victim make his/her own choices.

What to expect when you report to campus health service

  • You will be treated as a medical emergency and stabilised;
  • You will be informed of your legal rights;
  • You will be given emergency contraception to avoid a pregnancy;
  • You will be given prophylactic treatment against Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI);
  • You will be given HIV testing and counselling;
  • You will be given Tetanus Toxoid if any cuts or abrasion are present;
  • You will be referred to a public/private health facility for Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP);
  • You will be given information on a follow-up services like psychological support. TOJ

RELATED ARTICLE: What Students Should Know About Mental Health And Awareness

Important numbers

Emergency Health Service

  • Auckland Park Kingsway (APK): 011 559 3837
  • Auckland Park Bunting (APB): 011 559 1238
  • Doornfontein Campus (DFC): 011 559 6544
  • Soweto Campus (SWC): 011 559 5571

Protection services

  • APK: 011 559 2555
  • APB: 011 559 1312
  • DFC: 011 559 6450
  • SWC: 011 559 5555

PsyCaD

  • 24 Hour Crisis Line: 0800 777 000

If an individual required additional support refer them to . . .

Content obtained from UJ Campus Health Service.

Feature image: #MeToo illustration.

Photo by Lum3n.com from Pexels.

1 comments on “What (UJ) Students Should Know About Date Rape”

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